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Arboretum
"A man does not plant a tree for himself, he plants it for posterity." - Alexander Smith   
Scarlet Oak
(Quercus coccinea)

Donated by Dr. James & Roxie Underwood
Tree Map Location: # 56
In Memory of Cecil R. Porter

Scarlet oak tree Scarlet oak leaf Scarlet oak bark Scarlet oak fruit


Leaf: Alternate, simple, 3 to 7 inches long, oval in shape with very deep sinuses and bristle-tipped lobes, shiny green above, paler and generally hairless below but may have tufts in vein axils.  
Flower: Monoecious; males are borne on slender yellow-green catkins; females are borne on very short axilliary spikes, both appear with the leaves in spring.  
Fruit: Acorns are 1/2 to 1 inch long, with the cap covering 1/2 of the nut, cap scales are shiny, somewhat resembling a varnished black oak cap, scales on edges of cap generally not loose; the tip of the acorn may have concentric rings or fine cracks; maturing i  
Twig: Moderately stout, red-brown with multiple terminal buds; buds reddish brown, plump, pointed, slightly angled, and covered with a light colored pubescence on the top half.  
Bark: On young trees, gray-brown, with smooth streaks; later becoming darker and developing irregular broad ridges and narrow furrows especially near the base.  
Form: A medium size tree reaching up to 80 feet tall with generally poor form, irregular crown, and many dead branches. A butt-swell is often noticeable, and often is useful in identification.  
Source: College of Natural Resource Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University  
Website: http://www.cnr.vt.edu/dendro

To participate in the Kaskaskia College Arboretum please contact:
Office of Institutional Advancement
618-545-3069
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