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Kaskaskia College Course Syllabus

ENGL 102

 

IAI C1 901R

 

 

 

    I.  COURSE LOCATION

         X   ON CAMPUS         CCC

 

   II.  COURSE IDENTIFICATION

        PREFIX: ENGL    NUMBER: 102    NAME: English Composition II

 

3          LECTURE HOURS               LIBA 04900                CURRICULUM & NO.

0          LABORATORY HOURS     1.1/230401                  PCS-CIPS NUMBER

3          CREDIT HOURS                              N                     VARIABLE (Y/N)     

0          CLINICAL HOURS                            N                     REPEATABLE (Y/N)

0          SOE HOURS                                      0                      TIMES

 

       

  III.  DIVISION TO WHICH COURSE IS ASSIGNED

            X         BACCALAUREATE/TRANSFER

                        CAREER EDUCATION

                        CONTINUING COMMUNITY EDUCATION

                        ABE/ASE

                        HEALTH OCCUPATIONS

                        OTHER

 

 

   IV.  CATALOG DESCRIPTION OF COURSE

This course focuses on research, argumentative prose, and critical analysis.  Students develop library skills, including the use of online databases for the purpose of research; master outlining, summarizing, and paraphrasing; and learn to avoid plagiarism through correct documentation.  A major component of the course (constituting at least 50 percent of the final course grade) is a research paper, specifically, a documented, multi-source argumentative essay of at least 2500 words.  All essays will be computer generated.

 

 

    V.  PREREQUISITES FOR THE COURSE

          English Composition 101

 

 

   VI.  METHODS OF INSTRUCTION

            X         DISCUSSION-LECTURE                            SEMINAR

                        LABORATORY                                              TELE-LECTURE (FILM-TV)

                        CORRESPONDENCE                                 LABORATORY-DISCUSSION

                        TELEVISION (TELECOURSE)                      LECTURE

                        RADIO                                                            LECTURE-LABORATORY

                        INDEPENDENT STUDY                               OTHER (IDENTIFY):

                        CO-OP

 

 

  VII.  OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE (USE ADDITONAL PAGES AS NECESSARY)

 

A.                 To demonstrate skill in various types of writing, especially expository, critical

analysis, and argumentation.

            B.         To master research procedures.

            C.        To gain competency in using the library and online databases for research.

D.        To illustrate proper documentation and works cited materials according to the MLA style.

E.         To gain a familiarity with APA-style documentation.

 

 

  VIII.  A.  REQUIRED TEXTBOOK(S)

 

            TITLE: Writing Research Papers: A Complete Guide

        AUTHOR (S): Lester, James D., and James D. Lester Jr.

        COPYRIGHT DATE: 2007                  EDITION: Twelfth Ed.

        PUBLISHING COMPANY: Pearson Longman

 

 

            B. 

 

            TITLE:             AUTHOR(S):  

            COPYRIGHT DATE:              EDITION:       

            PUBLISHING COMPANY:  

 

IX.              SUPPLEMENTARY INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IDENTIFY GENERAL SOURCES: 

                        Internet/online databases

                        Any good pocket dictionary

                               

         IF EXTENSIVE COLLATERAL READINGS ARE REQUIRED FROM SPECIFIC

         BOOKS, PROVIDE INFORMATION.

 

 

X.                 METHODS OF EVALUATION OF STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE COURSE

 

                        1.         Composition evaluations (essays and summaries and paraphrases).

                        2.         Research paper evaluation.

                        3.         Final examination.

 

The writing course sequence must include production of a documented, multi-source argumentative essay of no fewer than 2500 words in final version.  Furthermore, at least 5000 words will be written out of class during the course of the semester, so the approximate weight of the research paper should be 50% of the course grade.

 

XI.              COURSE OUTLINE

 

I.                    Argument and Persuasive Writing

 

                                    A.        Finding subjects

                                    B.         Narrowing topic

                                    C.        Creating suitable thesis

                                    D.        Selecting strategies

                                    E.         Avoiding fallacies

 

                       

                        II.         The Research Paper

 

                                    A.        Synopsis and Summaries

                                    B.         Note taking techniques

                                    C.        Paragraph and long article summaries

                                    D.        Paraphrasing

                                    E.         Using the library/ online databases

                                    F.         Preparing a research paper

                                                1.         Preliminary procedures

                                                            a.         Types of research papers

                                                            b.         Selection of topic

                                                            c.         Creation of thesis

                                                            d.         Finding references

                                                2.         Outline

                                                3.         Documentation—focus to be on MLA style

                                                4.         Works Cited

                                                5.         Research paper form

 

 

                        III.  Electronic Research/ Library

 

                                    Students will be expected to utilize for the purposes of research:

                                   

A.        the library

B.         the internet

                                    C.        the Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)

                                    D.        online periodical databases

 

 

NOTES:  Students are expected to gain competency in the use of Kaskaskia College’s online periodical databases and utilize these databases during their research.

 

ü      Instructors must publish a plagiarism statement in their handouts. Departmental policy is that a deliberately plagiarized research paper results in a grade of F.

 

ü      As part of the Kaskaskia College comprehensive Assessment Program for Communications, all students in English 102 will take a pre- and post-test assessing their knowledge of the research process.  Furthermore, all instructors are asked to complete an assessment form that lists some of the assessment techniques utilized at both the summative and formative levels; the form also allows for the use of the data to make changes to the course the next time that it is taught.  The grading standards/ rubric for all compositions and the assessment form are attached.

 

 

 

PREPARED BY:

 

REVIEW/REVISION DATE:

 

REVIEWED BY:

 

 

English 102 Learning Outcomes

 

Learning Outcome I:

 

The students should be able to do the following:

 

1.      Students should understand the tone required for formal research paper.

2.      Distinguish between effective support and ineffective support.

3.      Understand the principle of outlining.

4.      Appreciate argumentative writing techniques and understand the principles of argument, including evaluating premises, syllogisms, and claims of truth, falsity, and validity.

5.       Avoid logical fallacies, emotional language, and unsupported claims.

6.      Write using Standard English grammar and punctuation.

 

Learning Outcome II:

 

Students should be able to do the following:

 

1.      Understand the documentation principles and the Modern Language Association (MLA) style manual.

2.      Avoid plagiarism by being able to change style in the process of summarizing and paraphrasing.

3.      Quote effectively; resist the tendency to over-quote.

4.      Avoid plagiarism by accurately documenting with in-text citations material borrowed from outside sources.

5.      Understand the Works Cited page and the correlation between this list of sources and the in-text citations.

6.      Recognize the universal concepts MLA-style documentation shares with other styles, particularly the APA style.

7.      Understand the concept of common knowledge in determining what material to document.

 

Learning Outcome III:

 

Students should be able to do the following:

 

1.      Perform basic research by using an online public access catalog (OPAC), online periodical databases, and the internet.

2.      Make use of reference sections, special collections, bibliography of bibliographies, and supplemental bibliographies available in scholarly books.

3.      Use non-internet sources, recognizing the existence of source material in print form.

4.      Understand the universal quality of all libraries so that research is not limited to one library.

5.      Understand the workings of interlibrary loan.

6.      Discover the current knowledge concerning a topic by reviewing recent periodical literature and other publications, narrow a research topic, and organize research material for an effective presentation.

7.      Gather research in an effective manner so as to keep organized, avoid plagiarism, eliminate redundancies in the process, and become informed regarding positions expressed by both opponents and proponents.

8.      Create a working bibliography and an annotated bibliography.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

English Department

COMPOSITION GRADING STANDARDS

While appreciating the individualism inherent in the essay grading process, the department adheres to the holistic method of evaluating essays and expects consideration of content, structure, and mechanics. The following standards in grading are designed to establish uniformity among all teachers of Composition:

EXCELLENT ESSAY --A

Content-- The content of the A essay exhibits a mature level of thought with a clearly stated thesis and abundant support in the forms of concrete examples, details, and reasoning. The essay addresses the specified audience and the assigned rhetorical mode.

 

Structure—It is structured with a complete introduction, graceful transitions through supporting paragraphs, and a fitting conclusion.

 

Mechanics—Mechanically, the paper employs a variety of sentence structures, precise word choice, and figures of speech to create a clear tone; it is void of repetition, wordiness, and colloquialisms.

GOOD ESSAY-- B

Content-- The B essay has a clearly stated thesis; the supporting paragraphs exhibit adequate examples and details with clear reasoning. The essay addresses the specified audience and the assigned rhetorical mode.

 

Structure-- The structure displays an introduction, clear transitions, and an acceptable conclusion. If not highly impactful, it has few structural weaknesses.

 

Mechanics-- The paper's mechanics consist of a variety of sentence structures and accurate word choices; it has few errors in Standard English. However, a mere absence of errors should not be rewarded with a grade of 6-.

AVERAGE ESSAY--C

Content-- The average essay has a clearly stated thesis; however, it is often trite or general. It attempts to display examples and details, but fails to provoke thought. The essay fails to address the specified audience, but it does reflect the assigned rhetorical mode.

 

Structure-- The structure presents a beginning, middle, and end, but lacks transitions. It has few structural weaknesses, but oftentimes structure is its 9nly strength.

Mechanics--Sentence structures are not varied and are often repetitive; unique word choices are not apparent. Errors in Standard English are commonplace; however, the essay does not have major sentence errors, such as comma splices, fragments, and run-ons.

 

POOR ESSAY--D

Content—The poor essay lacks a clearly stated thesis.  It fails to display examples and details, but instead the paragraphs are filled with repeated generalities.  The essay fails to address the specified audience, and oftentimes it does not even reflect the assigned rhetorical mode.

Structure—The structure presents a beginning, middle, and end, but lacks transitions.  The body paragraphs show little unity, order, or coherence.

Mechanics—Sentence structures are mostly simple and most sentences restate the previous thought; simple word choices ("their"and"its") are incorrect and confused. The most flagrant errors in Standard English are prevalent.  Most seriously, a few comma splices, fragments, and run-ons remain uncorrected.

 

FAILING ESSAY—F

 

Content—This essay lacks a clearly stated thesis.  It fails to display examples and details, but instead the paragraphs are filled with repeated generalities.  The essay fails to address the specified audience, and oftentimes it does not even reflect the assigned rhetorical mode.

Structure—The structure fails to present a beginning, middle, and end.  The body paragraphs do not show unity, order, or coherence.

Mechanics—Sentence structures are mostly simple and most sentences restate the previous thought; simple word choices ("their"and"its") are incorrect and confused. The most flagrant errors in Standard English are prevalent.  Most seriously, many comma splices, fragments, and run-ons remain uncorrected.

Failure to eliminate comma splices, fragments, and run-ons from any essay should constitute a failing grade for the assignment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty Assessment Form

For Learning Outcomes

 

 

Faculty Name ____

Semester:  Fall/ Spring/ Summer                 Year: ______

 

Course:  _ _______

 

General Assessment Strategies

 

Measurable course objectives on syllabus (pick any two):

 

#1 

 

 

#2

 

 

How were these course objectives assessed?

 

#1

 

 

#2

 

 

What results did you note and what changes will you make the next time you teach this course based on the results of these assessment tools?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty

Form A


Classroom Assessment Techniques (CAT’s)

 

Specific strategies for assessment of learning outcomes and for daily or weekly improvement of student learning.

 

 

What were a few CAT’s utilized this semester for specific Learning Outcomes?  List outcome and CAT:

 

#1.

 

 

#2.

 

 

#3.

 

 

What were some of the most significant results that you received this semester?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What changes would you make the next time you teach this course as a result of a CAT?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty

Form B

Faculty Evaluation Form of The Implementation of CAT’s and Assessment Techniques

 

Faculty Name ______________________

 

Semester:  Fall/ Spring/ Summer                 Year:  ____________

 

Course:  _________________________   Date last taught _________________

 

 

 

The last time you taught this course you answered the following questions concerning general assessment strategies on Form A and specific CAT’s on Form B: 

 

“What changes will you make the next time you teach this course based on the results of these assessment tools?”                     

 

and…

 

“What changes would you make the next time you teach this course as a result of a CAT?”

 

Please state some of your changes that you implemented:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please summarize the results of your changes:

 

 

 

 

 

What changes will you make the next time you teach this course based on the results of these changes in your assessment strategies and what new CAT’s will you implement because of these changes?

 

 

 

Faculty

Form C